Etsy is an e-commerce website (etsy.com) focused on handmade or vintage items and supplies, as well as unique factory-manufactured items. These items fall under a wide range of categories, including art, photography, clothing, jewelry, food, bath and beauty, quilts, knick-knacks, and toys. Many sellers also sell craft supplies such as beads, wire, and jewelry-making tools. All vintage items must be at least 20 years old.[2] The site follows in the tradition of open craft fairs, giving sellers personal storefronts where they list their goods for a fee of US$0.20 per item.[3]
As of March, 2016, Etsy's top three competitors according to Hoovers Online are Amazon Handmade, Craigslist, and eBay.[91] Etsy has been compared to "a crafty cross between Amazon and eBay",[52] and to "your grandma's basement".[92] Etsy also has a number of direct competitors. DaWanda [de], based in Germany, closed in August 2018, ezebee.com, based in Switzerland, is a global competitor, but also caters to freelancers and professionals[93] Bonanza (formerly Bonanzle and 1000 Markets[94]) is based in the United States and focuses on clothing and fashion, Zibbet and Made It which are based in Australia, iCraft is based in Canada,[95] Artfire is based in the United States,[96] and Hello Pretty is an online craft marketplace targeted at South Africans.[97] Tindie is based in Portland, Oregon, and focuses on technology and electronics.[98] ArtYah is based in California, United States undergoing speedy growth and has worldwide sellers and consumers of handmade items, vintage and some craft supplies.[99]
Whew, it feels like we just barely made it through the Christmas holiday season, but now Valentine’s Day is just around the corner! I made these ninja printable Valentine’s Day cards at the request of my seven-year-old son who asked if I would design “some valentines for boys – with no glittery hearts or love and all that girly stuff!” After reminding him that valentines cards are for Valentine’s Day and all, he finally relented and let me add a few hearts to the cards…as long as they weren’t glittery!
The presentation of the cards—the packaging—helps make a successful handmade card business. A card that is neatly presented in a cellophane envelope looks more professional and can command a higher price than one that is unpackaged. Presenting cards in some form of packaging stops cards from becoming dirty or dog-eared and it also gives the ideal opportunity for further marketing. A label on the back with your phone number or website address could help you solicit further orders. Remember to consider shipping and packaging when factoring the costs per unit in your pricing formula.
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