We downloaded the available Mac greeting card programs – there are only six we could find that keep their software up to date and seemed safe to download – and tested them over the course of several weeks. In total, we spent about 40 hours designing cards and playing with the programs’ features so we could make well-informed comparisons between them. We created some event and holiday cards from scratch and with the provided templates. In each program, we also made invitations to a summer ice cream party to see if the software could help us make the designs we had in our heads a reality.
In February 2008, trouble at eBay, including a strike by some dissatisfied sellers, brought speculation that Etsy could be an increasing competitor.[55] At the same time, however, some Etsy sellers expressed discontentment with how Etsy was handling complaints about stores.[56] At the time, a comparison of the two websites included complaints that on Etsy, items are difficult to find, the interface "feels slow", and the buying and selling process is United States-centric.[57] Other reviewers enjoyed using Etsy's specialized search options,[58][59] including the "Shop Local" tool.[60]
On October 1, 2013, Dickerson held an online Town Hall Meeting to announce that Etsy would now permit factory-made goods and drop shipping, provided the seller either designed or hired designers of the items, disclosed to Etsy their factory, disclosed that they used factories and took "ownership" of the process. In that meeting and afterward, Etsy claimed the meaning of the word "handmade" should be redefined to encompass factory made.[85]
In July 2008, Rob Kalin ceded the position of CEO to Maria Thomas.[61] Some longtime Etsy employees left the company in August 2008, including founders Haim Schoppik and Chris Maguire.[62] In September 2008, Etsy hired Chad Dickerson, who formerly worked at Yahoo!, as Chief Technology Officer.[63] The company acknowledged concerns about vendors selling other people's work as their own.[64]
Get up-to-the-minute values for cards made from 1867 to 1989 that are graded by PSA, SGC, GAI and BVG/BGS. Access over 10,893,973 auction records by eBay and the hobby's major auction houses with thousands of auctions being posted daily. We currently have 15,409 different card sets totaling 383,720 cards with images and growing by the day. Each card has it's own profile page with in-depth auction information broken down by Grader/Grade into an easy-to-read grid.
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The presentation of the cards—the packaging—helps make a successful handmade card business. A card that is neatly presented in a cellophane envelope looks more professional and can command a higher price than one that is unpackaged. Presenting cards in some form of packaging stops cards from becoming dirty or dog-eared and it also gives the ideal opportunity for further marketing. A label on the back with your phone number or website address could help you solicit further orders. Remember to consider shipping and packaging when factoring the costs per unit in your pricing formula.
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