As of December 31, 2014, Etsy had 54 million users registered as members,[4] and the online marketplace for handmade and vintage goods connected 1.4 million sellers with 19.8 million buyers.[5] At the end of 2014, Etsy had 685 employees,[6] and had 29 million items listed.[7] In 2014, Etsy had total sales, or Gross Merchandise Sales (GMS), of US$1.93 billion on the platform.[4] Of this, 36.1% came from purchases made on mobile devices and 30.9% was generated outside the US.[4]

Thank you so much for your beautiful prints. I have been looking for some maps to put on the top of my dad’s old desk and you have just what I was looking for!!! So excited. I tried to transfer a print once and it didn’t turn out so I can send a print to Office Depot to print for me. Again, thanks and I will let you know how it turns out!!!!!!!!!!!
The site was launched in 2005[43] by iospace, a small company composed of Robert Kalin, Chris Maguire, and Haim Schoppik. The initial version had taken two and a half months to build.[44] Later Jared Tarbell joined the team. Former NPR executive Maria Thomas joined as COO in 2008, was promoted to CEO and left Etsy in December 2009. Robert Kalin resumed his role as CEO from December 2009 until July 2011.[45] Investors include Sean Meenan,[46] Albert Wenger,[47] Spencer and Judson Ain, Union Square Ventures, and founders of Flickr and Delicious.[48]
“As the world becomes increasingly eco-conscious, couples are choosing stylish and sustainable solutions for their weddings,” says Dayna. “Incorporating biodegradable floral confetti, vintage decor and even reusable straws are just a few ways to bring earth-friendly values into your big day.” And going green doesn’t have to mean skimping on personalized details. Case in point: this super customizable (and thoroughly charming) cake topper made from recycled cardstock.
If you are making cards or other products using third-party graphics, remember to check out the terms of the artist. Not all font creators, stamp and graphics designers, and other artists allow you to sell work that you have created using their work. Some of these companies have restrictions. These restrictions might include limiting the number of cards made from any one stamp in a year or how the cards may be sold (for instance from retail outlets only and not online or from markets). Some companies require that the stamp information is placed on the back of the card or that the designer's name is credited.
Have I made my point yet?  They are not kidding when they say bioDIVERSITY.  There is literally every form of living thing available to choose from.  Butterflies and water fowl, more frogs, turtles and lizards than I ever knew existed.  Weird fancy pigeons, big and small game animals…it just goes on and on and on.  The only bad part is you can’t search for specific images but hey, it’s free!
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